03.28.16

The Color of the Gospel

Recently a black colleague of mine asked me if I was working on any new writing projects. I told him as a matter of fact I am. It is a book on The Pilgrim’s Progress. He quickly responded, “Oh, will that be a black man’s perspective on The Pilgrim’s Progress?” His response was both telling and disappointing. It was telling in how much the conversation of race and the politics of race have overtaken our conversation in the church. It was disappointing because it suggested that black men and women can’t write anything except it be explicitly the “black perspective” on a thing.

I know it might sound a bit sacrilegious these days to even raise the question, but could it be that our preoccupation with race is moving us to color the gospel? In other words, we can be so concerned with black and white issues or issues of social justice and not realize that we are slowly slipping away from the character and content of the gospel message into our personal cultural and social agendas. Consequently, we may unwittingly be saying that if the gospel proclamation does not include my felt sociological needs or cultural affirmations then it is a gospel insufficient. Thus, we may be coloring the gospel with our preferences.

It would seem obvious, but I often find the obvious needs restating: The gospel is not black or white. The gospel is the color of water (that may not be the best analogy in light of the present circumstances of our brothers and sisters in Flint, MI, but bear with me). In the book The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother, author James McBride describes a conversation where he asked his mother, “What color is God?” She responded with a deftness seemingly lost on us today. She said, “God is the color of water.” In other words, he is not definable by color. He is not bound by our cultural preoccupations, and neither is the gospel.

The danger the church must be leery of today is the same danger she has had to combat from her beginning – cultural pride. And cultural pride is no respecter of culture. From the conversation Jesus had with the woman at the well (), to the neglect of the Hellenistic Christians (), to Paul’s own explicit cultural denials (), the struggle to overcome cultural pride has been and is real. White Christians struggle with it. Black Christians struggle with it. Hispanic Christians struggle with it. Asian Christians struggle with it. And the list goes on and on. Racism is rooted in it. And too often my bitter responses to racism are rooted in it as well.

Sadly, it is evidenced in the nature of our conversations and exchanges. Much of the discussion on race today is accusatory–blacks accusing whites of not listening or caring; whites accusing blacks of being too sensitive and unyielding. The biblical truth is that we are all sinners and my cultural pride is no better (or worse) than yours.

Remember, Christ reminds us that there is ever a log in my eye even as I graciously point out the speck in the eye of my brother or sister (). I find these words of Christ requiring me to have more self-suspicion than suspicion of others. Sadly the current conversation on race often has it reversed. Nevertheless, all of my accusations (whether black or white) need to come with an admission of guilt and a subsequent confession of Christ as sufficient for accuser and accused. As a Christian black man, though I decry injustice, I am ever admitting that my biggest problem is not police brutality, or economic inequality, or disproportionate incarcerations. My biggest issue is the pride in my own heart. Cultural idols exist in black hearts as well as white ones.

I am hoping to soon complete work on the book about The Pilgrim’s Progress. The author of this book will be a black man. The thoughts and intent of this book will be those of a Christian man. Yet, like God, the gospel, and even my life, I pray this book would be less about color and more about Christ.

4:1 Now when Jesus learned that the Pharisees had heard that Jesus was making and baptizing more disciples than John (although Jesus himself did not baptize, but only his disciples), he left Judea and departed again for Galilee. And he had to pass through Samaria. So he came to a town of Samaria called Sychar, near the field that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob’s well was there; so Jesus, wearied as he was from his journey, was sitting beside the well. It was about the sixth hour.

A woman from Samaria came to draw water. Jesus said to her, “Give me a drink.” (For his disciples had gone away into the city to buy food.) The Samaritan woman said to him, “How is it that you, a Jew, ask for a drink from me, a woman of Samaria?” (For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans.) 10 Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” 11 The woman said to him, “Sir, you have nothing to draw water with, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? 12 Are you greater than our father Jacob? He gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did his sons and his livestock.” 13 Jesus said to her, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, 14 but whoever drinks of the water that I will give him will never be thirsty again. The water that I will give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life.” 15 The woman said to him, “Sir, give me this water, so that I will not be thirsty or have to come here to draw water.”

16 Jesus said to her, “Go, call your husband, and come here.” 17 The woman answered him, “I have no husband.” Jesus said to her, “You are right in saying, ‘I have no husband’; 18 for you have had five husbands, and the one you now have is not your husband. What you have said is true.” 19 The woman said to him, “Sir, I perceive that you are a prophet. 20 Our fathers worshiped on this mountain, but you say that in Jerusalem is the place where people ought to worship.” 21 Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father. 22 You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 But the hour is coming, and is now here, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father is seeking such people to worship him. 24 God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.” 25 The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming (he who is called Christ). When he comes, he will tell us all things.” 26 Jesus said to her, “I who speak to you am he.”

27 Just then his disciples came back. They marveled that he was talking with a woman, but no one said, “What do you seek?” or, “Why are you talking with her?” 28 So the woman left her water jar and went away into town and said to the people, 29 “Come, see a man who told me all that I ever did. Can this be the Christ?” 30 They went out of the town and were coming to him.

31 Meanwhile the disciples were urging him, saying, “Rabbi, eat.” 32 But he said to them, “I have food to eat that you do not know about.” 33 So the disciples said to one another, “Has anyone brought him something to eat?” 34 Jesus said to them, “My food is to do the will of him who sent me and to accomplish his work. 35 Do you not say, ‘There are yet four months, then comes the harvest’? Look, I tell you, lift up your eyes, and see that the fields are white for harvest. 36 Already the one who reaps is receiving wages and gathering fruit for eternal life, so that sower and reaper may rejoice together. 37 For here the saying holds true, ‘One sows and another reaps.’ 38 I sent you to reap that for which you did not labor. Others have labored, and you have entered into their labor.”

39 Many Samaritans from that town believed in him because of the woman’s testimony, “He told me all that I ever did.” 40 So when the Samaritans came to him, they asked him to stay with them, and he stayed there two days. 41 And many more believed because of his word. 42 They said to the woman, “It is no longer because of what you said that we believe, for we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this is indeed the Savior of the world.”

43 After the two days he departed for Galilee. 44 (For Jesus himself had testified that a prophet has no honor in his own hometown.) 45 So when he came to Galilee, the Galileans welcomed him, having seen all that he had done in Jerusalem at the feast. For they too had gone to the feast.

46 So he came again to Cana in Galilee, where he had made the water wine. And at Capernaum there was an official whose son was ill. 47 When this man heard that Jesus had come from Judea to Galilee, he went to him and asked him to come down and heal his son, for he was at the point of death. 48 So Jesus said to him, “Unless you see signs and wonders you will not believe.” 49 The official said to him, “Sir, come down before my child dies.” 50 Jesus said to him, “Go; your son will live.” The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him and went on his way. 51 As he was going down, his servants met him and told him that his son was recovering. 52 So he asked them the hour when he began to get better, and they said to him, “Yesterday at the seventh hour the fever left him.” 53 The father knew that was the hour when Jesus had said to him, “Your son will live.” And he himself believed, and all his household. 54 This was now the second sign that Jesus did when he had come from Judea to Galilee. (ESV)

6:1 Now in these days when the disciples were increasing in number, a complaint by the Hellenists arose against the Hebrews because their widows were being neglected in the daily distribution. And the twelve summoned the full number of the disciples and said, “It is not right that we should give up preaching the word of God to serve tables. Therefore, brothers, pick out from among you seven men of good repute, full of the Spirit and of wisdom, whom we will appoint to this duty. But we will devote ourselves to prayer and to the ministry of the word.” And what they said pleased the whole gathering, and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Spirit, and Philip, and Prochorus, and Nicanor, and Timon, and Parmenas, and Nicolaus, a proselyte of Antioch. These they set before the apostles, and they prayed and laid their hands on them.

And the word of God continued to increase, and the number of the disciples multiplied greatly in Jerusalem, and a great many of the priests became obedient to the faith.

And Stephen, full of grace and power, was doing great wonders and signs among the people. Then some of those who belonged to the synagogue of the Freedmen (as it was called), and of the Cyrenians, and of the Alexandrians, and of those from Cilicia and Asia, rose up and disputed with Stephen. 10 But they could not withstand the wisdom and the Spirit with which he was speaking. 11 Then they secretly instigated men who said, “We have heard him speak blasphemous words against Moses and God.” 12 And they stirred up the people and the elders and the scribes, and they came upon him and seized him and brought him before the council, 13 and they set up false witnesses who said, “This man never ceases to speak words against this holy place and the law, 14 for we have heard him say that this Jesus of Nazareth will destroy this place and will change the customs that Moses delivered to us.” 15 And gazing at him, all who sat in the council saw that his face was like the face of an angel. (ESV)

3:1 Finally, my brothers, rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you is no trouble to me and is safe for you.

Look out for the dogs, look out for the evildoers, look out for those who mutilate the flesh. For we are the circumcision, who worship by the Spirit of God and glory in Christ Jesus and put no confidence in the flesh— though I myself have reason for confidence in the flesh also. If anyone else thinks he has reason for confidence in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless. But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ. Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God that depends on faith— 10 that I may know him and the power of his resurrection, and may share his sufferings, becoming like him in his death, 11 that by any means possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead.

12 Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own. 13 Brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own. But one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, 14 I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus. 15 Let those of us who are mature think this way, and if in anything you think otherwise, God will reveal that also to you. 16 Only let us hold true to what we have attained.

17 Brothers, join in imitating me, and keep your eyes on those who walk according to the example you have in us. 18 For many, of whom I have often told you and now tell you even with tears, walk as enemies of the cross of Christ. 19 Their end is destruction, their god is their belly, and they glory in their shame, with minds set on earthly things. 20 But our citizenship is in heaven, and from it we await a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ, 21 who will transform our lowly body to be like his glorious body, by the power that enables him even to subject all things to himself. (ESV)

7:1 “Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.

“Do not give dogs what is holy, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, lest they trample them underfoot and turn to attack you.

“Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened. Or which one of you, if his son asks him for bread, will give him a stone? 10 Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a serpent? 11 If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask him!

12 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.

13 “Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. 14 For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few.

15 “Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves. 16 You will recognize them by their fruits. Are grapes gathered from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? 17 So, every healthy tree bears good fruit, but the diseased tree bears bad fruit. 18 A healthy tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a diseased tree bear good fruit. 19 Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. 20 Thus you will recognize them by their fruits.

21 “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. 22 On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?’ 23 And then will I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness.’

24 “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock. 25 And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock. 26 And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand. 27 And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell, and great was the fall of it.”

28 And when Jesus finished these sayings, the crowds were astonished at his teaching, 29 for he was teaching them as one who had authority, and not as their scribes. (ESV)

Tony Carter
Tony Carter serves as the Lead Pastor of East Point Church. Tony is married to his beloved, Adriane Carter, and their marriage has bore the fruit of five wonderful children. Holler at him on Twitter: @eastpc

C’mon Up!

  • Katie Cheng

    Thank you so much for this.

    • Tony Carter

      Thanks for stopping by the Porch. Come again!

  • Louis Love

    Hey Carter:
    Man. looking forward to that book.

    BTW, what would a Black man’s Perspective on Pilgrim’s Progress even begin to look like?

    My, my, my.

    • Tony Carter

      Good question man. I would have to think about that because I had not thought about it before :). Maybe Christian’s name wouldn’t be Graceless but “Bruh”? And maybe his friend wouldn’t be Hopeful, but “Huggy”?

      • Louis Love

        Yeah man and the City of Destruction would be renamed the City of Detroit.
        Sorry bout that Leython, you know I had to say it.

        • Leython Williams

          Ha! C’mon, don’t kick the city while it’s down; Redemption is on it’s way! I like the alliteration though.

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  • Darryl D

    Man oh man. As a young black 25 year old the pull towards things like liberation theology and black nationalism seems to be just as strong as it was back after the civil rights movement. I’ve always had to walk the line between caring about my blackness but also remembering the gospel is more important. A lot of young people my age just don’t see it alone as sufficient enough to bring about the change we want to see. Thank you so much for this article!

    • Tony Carter

      Thanks man! And thanks for sharing your thoughts on The Porch. I resemble those remarks. 🙂 Blessings bro!

  • Leython Williams

    Pastor Carter-

    I’m also looking forward to this book and I really appreciate this post!

    “The biblical truth is that we are all sinners and my cultural pride is no better (or worse) than yours…My biggest issue is the pride in my own heart.”
    Amen and Amen, brother! Our biggest problem is sin and our greatest need is a Savior…Christ is, indeed, sufficient.

    • Tony Carter

      Thanks Leython. Good hearing from you bro! And don’t let Pastor Love get you down. Let him know that Detroit is on the rise, and “don’t call it come back!” See ya in few months, Lord willing :).

  • William Norman

    Good read. I’m glad there’s balance here. The focus must start with self. And it must also broaden to the realization that justice, whether it be racial, economic, gender, whatever are not issues separate from the gospel. They are intricately woven into it from start to finish. It pains me to see believers miss this.

    • Tony Carter

      Amen brother! We must never forget what Jesus says to those who complained about perceived injustice in his day – . Whenever we are moved to hold accountable the unjust in this world, let us remember that in God’s eye injustice is in every heart. Thanks for hanging out on the Porch.

  • https://twitter.com/MarioPhillips Mario P

    great article, thank you pastor Carter.

  • Yolanda

    This was an amazing article. I couldn’t put my finger on the sin that so easily besets us, but you nailed it…Cultural Pride!

  • Stacey Westfall

    Praise the Lord for your words brother! I look forward to your book. I love Pilgrim’s Progress and am looking for ways that I can incorporate it into my homeschool curriculim for my children. So any books that explain the story and scriptures behind it is something I look forward to.

  • Lewis Oneal

    “I find these words of Christ requiring me to have more self-suspicion than suspicion of others. Sadly the current conversation on race often has it reversed.” THIS,THIS,THIS! We desperately need to look to Jesus for the answer (because He is) and not to the talking heads on TV or wherever. I appreciate your re-iteration it is a gentle reminder that we are not home yet and to not grow comfortable in the ways of this world. Thanks

    Now about this Pilgrim’s Progress book, all I want to know is when? I love your preaching and what I’ve read of yours is good too. So when I saw the first two sentences and my first thought was ‘that will be good’. Keep us updated. Also saw you and Dr.(?) Love joking about a “black man’s” Pilgrim’s Progress and just wanted to point you to a pretty good read by Brady “Phanatik” Goodwin’s work the City of Allegory. It is a modern retelling of sorts, you all might enjoy it. BTW Brady Goodwin was in the Cross Movement for a number of years and makes amazing music, I imagine Dr. Carter knows as the last time we spoke at SEBTS you seemed to know your CHH. 😉

    • Tony Carter

      Yeah bro, I am familiar with that book. Interesting take on the classic. My book is more of an analysis and companion to The Pilgrim’s Progress. I hope to complete it in the next few months (as time permits). Thanks for stopping by!

  • Amelia Thompson

    Thank you for this piece Pastor Carter! I really enjoy the work you and your colleagues have undertaken with The Front Porch. Would you share how you define what the African-American church is? Is it a church in the inner city or south that is 99 percent black, a church that supports social and racial justice or the church that exists within any African-American? Or none of the above? I ask because your piece makes me wonder to what extent the African American church as a separate entity does or should exist in light of the degree to which through Christ he came to triumph over all divisions. And to the extent that it does and should exist does its continuation offer opportunity for the Gospel to continue without the trappings of cultural pride?

    • Tony Carter

      Hello Amelia. Thanks for stopping by The Front Porch and contributing to it’s encouragement. Glad to hear that you have benefited and are encouraged by this platform. The encouragement is mutual.

      Defining the “black church” is not easy. I think of it like trying to define “mother”. The definitions are various, but most know what it is when we see it. The black church was born out of necessity. Black Christians being alienated from the life of the church and society in America, and in response to racism and discrimination developed congregations where black men and women led, preached, and organized. Sadly, in one since it is a segregation that segregation produced. It is found in rural, urban, suburban, north, south or wherever black families have been brought into community. Any predominantly black congregation that senses a connection with the church that has gone before is in some sense a black church. Perhaps this video we produced will help in addressing this question

      http://thefrontporch.org/interview/what-is-the-black-church/

      Anytime men and women gather according to cultural identifications there is the trapping of cultural pride. This is particularly true when such pride is deemed as necessary for the survival and promotion of that community, as it was with black communities in our country. The predominantly black church still exists just as the predominantly white church exists. This will continue to be as long as we have communities that are predominantly white and communities that are predominantly black. In most of those context, it is not only inevitable, but needful.

      However, I believe we are seeing more and more multi-cultural and multi-ethnic churches because we see a generation of Christians who live, work, and thus desire to worship more diversely. I believe that as our lives and communities are more integrated so too will be our churches. And then we will need to be wary of a multi-ethnic, multicultural pride against those who are not.

      Thanks again for stopping by. Hope to see you at the “Just Gospel” conference next year :).

      • Amelia Thompson

        Thank you Pastor Carter! That all makes sense to me! I look forward to attending JUST Gospel as well, God willing.

  • Donde Moore

    This book sounds amazing! We really need to put race into prospective and stop being accusing of others! Let’s love one another!