Anyabwile-Kristie

Kristie Anyabwile

Kristie Anyabwile is the wife of Thabiti, who serves as a Church Planting Pastor at Capitol Hill Baptist Church; he hopes to plant in Anacostia (Washington DC). She is the joyful mother of two daughters and one son.

Shepherding Women: What Is the Shepherd’s Responsibility for Women in the Congregation?

Episode (#016) | How do you care for godly women in a culture in a world that blurs the line between male and female? How might a pastor define biblical femininity for a growing generation of women who do not know what that means? C’mon up and join the conversation.

Shepherding Women: Are Women Under Shepherded?

Episode (#015) | Why should pastors be specifically invested in the older women in their congregations? How can we give our sisters opportunities to flourish in our churches? C’mon up and join the conversation.

biblical womanhood

On Being a Pastor’s Wife

The sisters Jamie Love and Kristie Anyabwile are back up on The Front Porch — choppin’ it up and discussing the journey of being a pastor’s wife. What does this … Continue reading

Sisters & Bible Study

Sisters Kristie Anyabwile and Jamie Love are up on the front porch, choppin’ it up about how to encourage other sisters in God’s Word and how to study it. Looking … Continue reading

Unity_Treated

Author Chat with Trillia Newbell on “United: Captured by God’s Vision for Diversity”

Author Trillia Newbell is back up on the porch, this time sitting with Thabiti and Kristie Anyabwile to discuss her new book, “United: Captured by God’s Vision for Diversity.” Discussing … Continue reading

Biblical Womanhood

Jamie Love sits with Trillia Newbell and Kristie Anyabwile on The Front Porch. These ladies discuss what Scripture says biblical womanhood is and why its unique features, which differently flourish … Continue reading

Women and Their Front Porch

Full of laughs, Kristie Anyabwile and Jamie Love chop it up and talk about what their front porches were like. From small-town to big porches, these ladies talk about how their front porches were training grounds for young women, boundaries for young men, a refuge for family and friends, and a display of African-American culture.

  • Page 2 of 2
  • 1
  • 2