Thabiti Anyabwile

Thabiti Anyabwile serves as a pastor of Anacostia River Church (Washington DC). He is the happy husband of Kristie and the adoring father of two daughters and one son. Holler at him on Twitter: @ThabitiAnyabwil

Fragmentary Notes on Mark’s Gospel (chap. 2-3)

The Lord moves around to the people teaching and healing so we might see who He really is and believe rather than object.

Fragmentary Notes on Mark’s Gospel (Mark 1)

A New Year’s resolution from Mark 1: keep picking men, praying to God, preaching the gospel, and providing needs.

Highlights and Lowlights from 2017

With nothing else to do, here’s my subjective list of “top ten stories” for 2017.

Unto Us a Son Is Given!

A Savior given only to the well-off could hardly be a Savior for us all. 

Dhati Lewis’ “Among Wolves” (Book Review)

We give Dhati Lewis’ book Among Wolves 4/5 rocking chairs–a great book for reading on the porch!

Urban Apologetics 3: Collective Restoration and Well-Being

Black people know we are not physically, psychologically, socially or economically well. Sometimes people in urban communities blame Christianity with being a major player in the destruction of Black well-being.

“Simon the Cyrenian Speaks” by Countee Cullen

A gospel- and culture-inspired work from Harlem Renaissance poet Countee Cullen

#Thriving17 Main Session 2: Bryan Loritts, “Keep Going”

Keep going in the work of multi-ethnic reconciliation and church unity.

#Frequency17 Breakout: The Legacy of the African-American Church

Hope is discovered in the very conditions that cause despair.

#Frequency17 Session 1: “I Dream of a Woke Church”

Pastor Eric Mason of Epiphany Fellowship kicks off #Thriving17 with a message called, “I Dream of a Woke Church.”

Front Porch Gossip (13 Oct 2017)

Articles and resources from around the web.

Urban Apologetics, 2: Origin and Identity

We have the truth that answers the longing for identity and knowledge of our origin. But we must free that truth from its mishandling over the centuries and apply it freshly to the existential needs of people in our communities.