Thabiti Anyabwile

Thabiti Anyabwile serves as a pastor of Anacostia River Church (Washington DC). He is the happy husband of Kristie and the adoring father of two daughters and one son. Holler at him on Twitter: @ThabitiAnyabwil

Who Are the Real Preachers of L.A.?

With the announcement of Oxygen’s new Fall show, “Preachers of L.A.”, the internet erupted with the expected controversy over the show. “Preachers of L.A.” features five mega-church pastors who grant … Continue reading

The Bishop and the Filmmaker: What T.D. Jakes and Tyler Perry Teach Us about the Black Church, Black Elites, and Authentic Spirituality

Recently an internet brouhaha erupted when film maker Tyler Perry, attending Bishop T.D. Jakes’ MegaFest Convention in Dallas, Texas, made a $1 million contribution to a proposed youth center. During … Continue reading

What’s Really Real about the new Reality TV Show “Preachers of L.A.”

Recently Oprah Winfrey’s television network, Oxygen, released a promotional video for a new reality TV series called, “Preachers of L.A.” The new program will follow six L.A.-area preachers: Bishops Noel … Continue reading

What Responsibility Does the Black Church Have Now for Preserving Black Culture

Pick up any text on the history of the Black Church, or listen to any speaker with an appreciation for the history of African America, and quite likely you will … Continue reading

How Thabiti Encountered the Doctrines of Grace

Thabiti Anyabwile, a former Muslim, talks about his first encounters with the different doctrines of grace, and how the Lord dropped breadcrumbs for him to follow.

“Blood Work” Book Review

Louis Love and Thabiti Anyabwile chop it up with Tony Carter — discussing his latest book, Blood Work: How the Blood of Christ Accomplishes Our Salvation. See more about Tony’s … Continue reading

Reformed Theology & Ethnocentrism

Discussing why many African-Americans feel foreign to Reformed theology, Thabiti Anyabwile explains how faith in Jesus Christ should radically redefine any Christian’s life and identity.

Being Black and Reformed

Thabiti Anyabwile talks about why it is healthy to push back on the notion that theology, and particularly Reformed theology, is ethnically and culturally bounded.