Jarvis J. Williams, PhD

Jarvis J. Williams is an associate professor of New Testament Interpretation at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He’s the author of Christ Redeemed ‘Us’ From the Curse of the Law: A Jewish Martyrological Reading of Galatians 3:13 and a forthcoming Galatians commentary in 2020 in the New Covenant Commentary Series.

Must A Canaanite Become an Israelite to Enter the Kingdom of Heaven?

May it be said of those who profess faith in Christ that our faith in, obedience to, faithfulness to, and loyalty to Jesus Christ is relentless and GREAT!

A Prayer of Lament for Ahmaud Arbery

We pray that you would help your hurting people believe by faith right now that sin, death, and injustice are NOT the final words in your redemptive story.

Jesus, THE Greatest of All Time!

While we relive the greatest of Michael Jordan, we should remember the truly greatest of all time.

The Gospel and Friendship Part 2: Application

Too often some who profess Christ choose to backbite, devour, and destroy one another in our churches and on social media rather than love one another.

The Gospel and Friendship Part 1: The Context of Gal. 4:12-20

In my hometown of Louisville, Kentucky, the old saying “a house divided” emerges every year during basketball season. This phrase refers to the basketball rivalry between the University of Louisville … Continue reading

Expositors Summit 2015 Preconference: Panel Discussion

C’mon up for a panel discussion that closed the 2015 Expositors Summit Preconference on The Pulpit and Reconciliation.

The Pulpit and Reconciliation: Session 1

C’mon up and hear Jarvis Williams deliver a raw, honest sermon and lecture from his perspective as a churchman of color, a Southern Baptist, and an evangelical scholar.

One New Man in Christ

Dr. Jarvis Williams exposits Ephesians 2:11-22 to highlight the glorious racial reconciliation Christians have with God and with each other in Christ.

The Word Became Flesh

The incarnation of God, the Son, who is Jesus Christ, the Jewish man, is why we celebrate Christmas. His incarnation is the moment in history when God, the Son, became Jesus, the Jewish man, in order to save Jews and Gentiles from their sins. The incarnation of Jesus Christ, therefore, offers hope for a racist world that is currently torn apart by sin, hate, and violence.

The Actual Accomplishment of Racial Reconciliation

Introduction In my previous blogs on racial reconciliation, I discussed the need for racial reconciliation and the provision for racial reconciliation. In post 1, I proposed that racism fundamentally exists … Continue reading

The Death of Jesus Christ as God’s Provision for Racial Reconciliation

Introduction In my first post on racial reconciliation, I proposed a gospel-centered vision for racial reconciliation. I suggested that the gospel of Jesus Christ is the solution to the problem … Continue reading

The Need for Gospel-Centered Racial Reconciliation

Introduction President Obama’s historic election to the White House in November 2008 spoke volumes about how far the United States has come on the race issue since the dawn of … Continue reading